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Home » Smith Corona » Electric Portable » 1960 #5TE219017
1960 Smith Corona Electric Portable Serial # 5TE219017 1960 Smith Corona Electric Portable typewriter, Serial # 5TE219017 Wayne Bouchard's 1960 Smith Corona Electric Portable typewriter. 2024-06-10 From the Virtual Typewriter Collection of Wayne Bouchard: 1960 Smith Corona Electric Portable Serial # 5TE219017 A Smith-Corona Portable Electric (5TE) typewriter with Elite 66 typeface.
This particular typewriter is in basic Sage Grey.

This is SC's first electric portable. Production began in the mid-1950s before being succeeded by the 6 series in the early 1960s. In terms of features and mechanics, it is the Silent-Super typewriter adapted for electro-mechanical operation. The only significant difference is the cam and lever system dividing the keys from the type bar links. Prior to the portables, development was done on standard (desktop) models and the system adapted to Silent-Super. It is worthy of noting that this was hardly the first electric typewriter on the market, nor the most sophisticated. (The latter title goes to IBM.) Therefore, the company was not working from scratch. The principles of electric operation were understood for 10-15 years prior to the introduction of this model. A drawback of this model is that, compared to the Silent-Super, with the addition of the motor and transformer, pulley system, and levers and springs needed for the electric operation, it is a much heavier unit, weighing in at 17.6 pounds, as opposed to the 14.2 pounds of it's manually operated predecessor.

The big advantage of electric typewriters is that the impact force of the type bars against the paper can be made completely uniform since it is no longer dependent on the typing technique of the operator, but the force applied by the power roll and the impression control, which was added to make handling multiple carbon copies easier and to give better results on the subsequent copies. A manual typewriter might be able to do three or four, whereas an electric could give good results with six or even eight before the inherent blurring made the rear-most carbons difficult to read because light strokes wouldn't prevent the impression from reaching them and the fact that the type bar would release quickly meant there was no risk of blurring or otherwise lower quality results from drag marks or rebounding type slugs.

1960 Smith Corona Electric Portable #5TE219017

Status: My Collection
Hunter: Wayne Bouchard (azweb100)
Created: 06-10-2024 at 04:56AM
Last Edit: 06-10-2024 at 05:06AM


Description:

A Smith-Corona Portable Electric (5TE) typewriter with Elite 66 typeface.
This particular typewriter is in basic Sage Grey.

This is SC's first electric portable. Production began in the mid-1950s before being succeeded by the 6 series in the early 1960s. In terms of features and mechanics, it is the Silent-Super typewriter adapted for electro-mechanical operation. The only significant difference is the cam and lever system dividing the keys from the type bar links. Prior to the portables, development was done on standard (desktop) models and the system adapted to Silent-Super. It is worthy of noting that this was hardly the first electric typewriter on the market, nor the most sophisticated. (The latter title goes to IBM.) Therefore, the company was not working from scratch. The principles of electric operation were understood for 10-15 years prior to the introduction of this model. A drawback of this model is that, compared to the Silent-Super, with the addition of the motor and transformer, pulley system, and levers and springs needed for the electric operation, it is a much heavier unit, weighing in at 17.6 pounds, as opposed to the 14.2 pounds of it's manually operated predecessor.

The big advantage of electric typewriters is that the impact force of the type bars against the paper can be made completely uniform since it is no longer dependent on the typing technique of the operator, but the force applied by the power roll and the impression control, which was added to make handling multiple carbon copies easier and to give better results on the subsequent copies. A manual typewriter might be able to do three or four, whereas an electric could give good results with six or even eight before the inherent blurring made the rear-most carbons difficult to read because light strokes wouldn't prevent the impression from reaching them and the fact that the type bar would release quickly meant there was no risk of blurring or otherwise lower quality results from drag marks or rebounding type slugs.

Typeface Specimen:

Photos:







An overview of the underside. Note the cover plate that is usually covering the cam and lever system at the top of the image since it is critical to the operation that it remain undamaged and unencumbered by stray items on the desk, etc.
An overview of the underside. Note the cover plate that is usually covering the cam and lever system at the top of the image since it is critical to the operation that it remain undamaged and unencumbered by stray items on the desk, etc.

Mechanically, this should look very familiar if you have any other 3, 4, 5, or 6 series manual Smith-Corona typewriter.
Mechanically, this should look very familiar if you have any other 3, 4, 5, or 6 series manual Smith-Corona typewriter.

A closer view of the cam and lever system with the individual reset springs associated with all the required levers.
A closer view of the cam and lever system with the individual reset springs associated with all the required levers.

Serial number 5 TE219017, located on the right side under the ribbon cover. Visible below the ribbon spool.
Serial number 5 TE219017, located on the right side under the ribbon cover. Visible below the ribbon spool.

Elite 66 typeface
12 pitch, 6 lines per inch.
Elite 66 typeface 12 pitch, 6 lines per inch.

44 watts! Not really... it's rated for that but mine "only" drew 30 watts.
44 watts! Not really... it's rated for that but mine "only" drew 30 watts.

Hunter: Wayne Bouchard (azweb100)

Wayne Bouchard's Typewriter Galleries [ My Collection ] [ My Sightings ]

Status: Typewriter Hunter
Points: 842

Collector of several things, including typewriters, slide rules, and mechanical calculators.
Started collecting typewriters in 2023 with a Royal HHE like the one I did my first book report on when I was in school and using my dad's old typewriter.



RESEARCH NOTE: When researching the Smith Corona Electric Portable on a computer with lots of screen real estate, you may find that launching the Smith Corona Serial Number page and the Smith Corona Electric Portable By Model/Year/Serial page in new browser windows can give you interesting perspectives on changes throughout the model series.